Vice Adm. John G. Hannink of the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps tore into Bill Gates at the start of a military tribunal that is expected to last several days. At 9:00 a.m. Monday morning, military police escorted Gates from GITMO’s Camp Delta detention block to the courtroom where Hannink and a 3-officer panel awaited Gates’ arrival. At Gates’ side was David Baluarte, an attorney who had once worked for the Center for Justice and International Law and in 2009 had lobbied for the release of Jihadists detained at Guantanamo Bay.

Vice Adm. Hannink’s first act consisted of linking Gates to Jeffrey Epstein and linking them to a child trafficking ring that Gates had run from a subterranean bunker beneath a ranch he had owned in Wyoming. He presented to the panel videos and images obtained from laptops and SD cards the military had seized during raids on several Gates-owned properties across the nation.

One disturbing video showed Gates and Epstein hatching plots on how to kidnap children from third-world nations and sell them to the highest bidders.

“El Salvador is ripe for the picking,” Bill Gates said on the video.

“No. The market for dark-skinned children is slim right now. Not even Hillary wants those. Caucasian or Caucasian-looking nets the most money,” Epstein said.

On the video, Bill Gates chuckled and smirked. “We should just get them here, like we’ve done before. It’s not like anyone can touch us. I’ve made sure we’re insulated.”

Vice Adm. Hannink addressed Gates’ lawyer: “Does your client have an answer for this?”

Gates leaned over and whispered in David Baluarte’s ear.

“It’s all roleplay. Yes, Bill and Jeffrey were friends. Jeffrey Epstein had many friends, and Bill was just one of them. And this video is nothing more than two men engaged in some roleplay that the military has exaggerated into some grand conspiracy to frame my client for crimes he never committed. Bill Gates is one of the smartest men on the planet. If he were planning to abduct children, do you really think he’d video tape his plans?” Baluarte said.

“Your client is also a narcissist and a megalomaniac,” Rear Adm. Hannink responded, and offered the panel a printout of a spreadsheet the military had obtained from one of Gates’ computers and subsequently deciphered.

The spreadsheet held 65 names. The 65 names belonged to children who had inexplicably gone missing while visiting national parks across the nation. Beside each name was a dollar amount, ranging from $250,000 to $3,000,000, and the age, hair and eye color of each child. The youngest was 4 at the presumed time of abduction.

Source: realrawnews.com;

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